Simple Ways to Cut Food Costs – Part 2

By Fred Langley 

Food Costs ImageLast week, I outlined portioning techniques as a way to trim food costs without cutting labor because not having enough staff can be a disaster.

This week I’ve outlined ways to stretch your food dollars. Making the most of the products you are selling stretches your dollars invested and earns you more in return. As with last week’s tips, you don’t have to use all of these tips, but the more you find that work for you in your restaurant, the more money you’ll save.

Make your dollars count

  • Use fruits and vegetables that are in season; they not only taste better, they are a better price.
  • Maximize the use of product, if you are offering asparagus in the spring, use the bottom woody part to make a creamy asparagus soup. Food cost on the soup will be next to nothing and your yield on the asparagus will be nearly 100 percent.
  • Use cabbage, always inexpensive, to add flavor and stretch the filling of pork or seafood used to make wonderful and cheap appetizers.
  • Save your meat scraps for specials or grind the meat into your burger.
  • Double the volume of your ground beef my making meatloaf sliders and meatballs for a great happy hour offering.
  • If you already have a selection of pasta dishes, add risottos to your menu.
  • Substitute less expensive almonds and peanuts for other expensive nuts like walnuts and pecans.
  • If you are serving a 6 oz portion of fish at night, make a great sandwich with 3 oz for lunchtime. Make the dish at half the cost and two-thirds the price.
  • Purchase whole chickens. It is one of the easiest things to butcher and you end up with chicken stock, leg and thigh meat for an appetizer, four chicken wings and two breasts.
  • Take your best cost dishes and recreate them to influence your mix even more.
  • Make other types of pesto because basil and pine nuts are so expensive. For example, make cilantro pesto, but substitute orange juice for lemon juice and almonds for pine nuts.
  • Buy fish that is in season. For example, Halibut’s seasons is spring and summer, making out of season purchases too expensive for an inferior product. But Mahi Mahi is good year round choice.
  • Make bread! It is not as hard as it seems and will save you a ton.

Attacking food cost is a great way to lower your prime cost while still supporting your labor needs. Let us help you and schedule your next coaching call today!

Fred Langley is the director of operations and restaurant coach for TheRestaurantExpert.com. As a former chef and restaurant owner, Fred found a new passion in helping other restaurant owners find success with systems and now focuses on it full time.

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4 Things Restaurant Owners Should Never Say – Redux

I speak no evil - Businessman and copyspaceEveryone has a phrase that when they hear it, they just want to go nuts. For me, there are four phrases that are like nails on a chalkboard. And I probably hear one of these phrases on a weekly basis as I travel the country giving speeches, consulting and coaching restaurant owners and managers just like you.

Read more about the four phrases on each of the blog posts below:

  1. “I don’t need a budget. I know my numbers.”
  2. “I can’t get my managers to do it.”
  3. “You don’t understand… our restaurant is different.”
  4. “Yes, but it takes too long.”

David Scott Peters is a restaurant expert, speaker, coach and trainer for independent restaurant owners. He is the developer of SMART Systems Pro, an online restaurant management software program helping the independent restaurant owner remain competitive and profitable in an industry boxed in by the big chain restaurants. He is best known as the SMART Systems guy who can walk into any restaurant and find $10,000 in undiscovered cash before he hits the back door… Guaranteed! Learn more at www.TheRestaurantExpert.com.

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Simple Ways to Cut Food Costs – Part 1

By Fred Langley

Food Costs ImageWhen you are struggling to bring down your prime cost number, it is always easier to focus on your cost of goods sold rather than cutting labor. Not having enough staff can be a disaster in your restaurant, but making the most of the products you are selling stretches your dollars invested and earns you more in return.

Use the following tips as a guide to pad your bottom line without cutting labor. You don’t have to use all of these tips, but the more you find that work for you in your restaurant, the more money you’ll save.

Portioning techniques

  • If you run a 30 percent food cost and over portion by 10 percent, you will raise your food cost to 33 percent.
  • Poly bags are to be used for everything possible. Even if it is cheap pasta, it will keep your dishes consistent.
  • Use properly sized ladles and dishers for all sauces, starches, etc. Go smaller than the portion because staff will over fill them.
  • Always use measuring cups and understand that eight fluid ounces is not the same as eight ounces by weight.
  • Make sure to always have a properly calibrated scale. A pound of butter will register 16 ounces if your scale is working properly.
  • Reusable plastic deli cups are great for stacking and they’re waterproof, so you can use them to portion fish.
  • Use standardized vessels if you are portioning on the fly.
  • Do some portion testing with the staff. Make the dish you are questioning in three different sizes, if the larger portion is the way to go for the dish, just price accordingly. Avoid cutting back on those dishes that the staff feel should be bigger; they will just make it bigger when you are not looking.
  • Make the investment and get smaller china if your costs are out of control. Cooks will fill whatever size plate is in front of them. Get smaller china especially if you have a buffet.
  • Have photos of the perfect plate to go with your recipe cards and keep them in a binder.
  • If you discover that portioning is a problem across the board with your whole menu, start to make changes systematically. Do not change everything across the board all at once.
  • Cut your prawns in half, long ways, before cooking. They will corkscrew and take up just as much if not more volume than a single

Next week I’ll give you more tips for lowering your food costs, focusing on making the most of the food you buy.

Fred Langley is the director of operations and restaurant coach for TheRestaurantExpert.com. As a former chef and restaurant owner, Fred found a new passion in helping other restaurant owners find success with systems and now focuses on it full time.

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How to Grow Your Employees into Management

By David Scott Peters

Spout-in-DirtI tell all the restaurant owners I meet: You need help. You cannot do everything we teach on your own.

And really, it’s pretty simple to say, “I need help.” The challenge is getting the help.

Here are the common mistakes independent restaurant operators make when it comes to hiring help and what to do instead.

Mistake No. 1 – hire a chain manager

As an independent operator, it’s tempting to hire a chain restaurant manager because you think they’ll bring their experience with systems to your restaurant. In the last decade I have helped literally thousands of restaurant owners, and I don’t think I can put my finger on any more than one restaurant where this decision has worked.

Why does it fail EVERY TIME? Because chain managers only know how to do what they are told to do. They don’t have the flexibility or interest in setting up and adjusting your systems.

Instead, let the candidates identify themselves without knowing they are interviewing for a position in management.

Post on your employee bulletin board that you are looking for people who would like to help you with special projects, such as entering recipe costing cards, setting up your inventory systems, etc. Let them come to you. You get them moving on the special projects, which gets the work done you needed done anyway, but you also get to see if they have the skill sets and work ethic you need in a manager.

If they don’t do a good job for you, your worst case scenario is they just don’t do any more special projects for you. The best case is you offer those who prove themselves one to two shifts a week as a manager in training (MIT) or shift supervisor.

Mistake No. 2 – talk them into management

Not everyone is built for management. Most operators think their best server, bartender or cook would make a great manager. In most cases, the answer is NO. For front-of-house people, it’s difficult to take a promotion and give up the cash and flexibility of that line position. And oftentimes being the best means they don’t have a lot of patience for those who just don’t get it.

Instead, have 2–3 in training at all times. Don’t settle for one person to promote to manager in training (MIT) or shift supervisor. Have two or three going at the same time. Train them in the skills they need and the tasks they need to accomplish to be successful. This way you allow the best to continue to show you they are willing to do what it takes to move up in your organization. Then, pick the most qualified. From that group of MITs, pick the best candidate to become an assistant manager and teach them. When they have shown you they can do the job, then promote them and pay them more.

Mistake No. 3 – anoint the princess or prince to supreme ruler

Desperate to fill your vacancy at general manager (GM), you take an unqualified person on your team and anoint them GM. Promoting them to GM doesn’t prepare them for the position. It doesn’t teach them what they have to do. It doesn’t mean they can lead the team. All it means is you are going to pay them more money and odds are not in your favor that they will succeed. In most instances, they disappoint you because they just weren’t ready for the level of responsibility, so they end up quitting or getting fired.

Instead, with your 2-3 MITs, promote them ONLY when they are ready. While they may be doing the tasks of the GM, they are not independent yet. You still need to be over their shoulders inspecting and training. Once they truly have mastered the tasks and demonstrated the skills needed, it’s time to promote them.

So the ultimate solution is to grow your managers into the position, don’t throw them into failure.

 

David Scott Peters is a restaurant expert, speaker, coach and trainer for independent restaurant owners. He is the developer of SMART Systems Pro, an online restaurant management software program helping the independent restaurant owner remain competitive and profitable in an industry boxed in by the big chain restaurants. He is best known as the SMART Systems guy who can walk into any restaurant and find $10,000 in undiscovered cash before he hits the back door… Guaranteed! Learn more at www.TheRestaurantExpert.com.

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One-Day Workshop for Restaurant Owners

Independent restaurant owners invited to learn ways to cut costs and increase sales

Controlling the Most Important Number in Your Restaurant… Prime Cost with a focus on Labor Costs
Presented by David Scott Peters, trainer, coach, speaker and founder of TheRestaurantExpert.com

July 8, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

TheRestaurantExpert.com World Headquarters
1125 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., Ste. 105
Phoenix, AZ 85027

What Attendees Will Learn:
- Why industry standards don’t apply to their restaurants
- What expenses make up this magic number called prime cost
- How to calculate this magic number and what makes it what it is
- Ways to improve managers’ performance
- How to avoid profit draining labor practices and take back control of your time clock.
- What to do to ensure you are using your labor dollars in the right department at the right time
- Why employees who work more than one position in your restaurant have the greatest potential for time clock abuse
- How to avoid cutting labor too soon
- How this simple acronym, PPETF, is your key to a well trained and efficient staff

Additional Information:

Restaurant Expert David Scott Peters teaches the key ways independent restaurant owners can immediately impact the bottom line, get more cash in the bank and motivate employees. Attendees to this seminar begin to make more money with their current restaurant menu just by digging in with the systems David teaches in this one-day seminar.

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How to Get Your Message Across to Restaurant Managers

By David Scott Peters

manager meeting

In this post I covered the pitfalls of not communicating with your management team and offered up a solution to avoid a failure to communicate. The solution is to have weekly managers meetings.

To begin having effective managers meetings, follow this four-step process that prepares everyone for this new activity in the routine.

Step 1

Step one is the planning meeting. This is the step where you look at last week’s priorities and goals and audit where they are. Did they get accomplished, did you hit your goals or were there things that happened that delayed results? Take the time to really look at things with a detailed eye.

Next, create your list of goals for you and your team for the upcoming week. Be specific and clear in the list of what you want done, how you want it done, how well you want it done and more importantly by when. Without deadlines nothing would get done.

Step one applies to every restaurant owner whether you have a partner or not. The only difference is when you have a partner, this step becomes even more important.

Too often in independent restaurants, partners don’t communicate. As a result, they send mixed signals to their employees and managers because they ask them to do two completely opposite things or get the same thing done two completely different ways. Or worse, they do this directly in front the employee resulting in an argument/fight between the partners.

This is the quickest way to get your employees to tune you out and then do whatever they want. The employee knows that they can just point fingers to the other partner and there will be no recourse.

If you have a partner this is the most important step because it puts you both on the same page, allowing you to all communicate the same game plan from the same playbook.

Even if you don’t have a partner, you can create a similar challenge when you continue to change your mind on how you want something done, telling one manager and then getting mad at another because they aren’t doing it the new way, even though they never got the message.

Step 2

Meet with your general manager and communicate the goals for the next week. Gather your general manager’s priorities that need to be addressed and added to the list. This is your opportunity to make sure your general manager is on the same page as you. You are also setting the general manager up for success to conduct an effective and efficient managers meeting.

Step 3

Step three is the agenda. Now that your general manager has your list of goals for the week, he or she will create an agenda for the meeting. The agenda should include such things as a start time and a finish time and topics to be addressed.

Before the meeting, clearly communicate what ALL of the other managers will need to bring to the meeting. If any of the other managers have something they want to add to the agenda, they need to get it to the general manager at least two days before the managers meeting.

Please note that your manager meeting should not be scheduled for anything more than 90 minutes. Anything longer becomes counterproductive.

Step 4

Step four is conducting the actual meeting. One of the biggest questions I get all the time is, “I’m the owner, shouldn’t I conduct the meeting?” The short answer is NO, unless you fulfill the general manager role as well. Your general manager is supposed to execute the plan. He or she is going to be held accountable for these goals, so you need to put them in a leadership role and demonstrate that the general manager is the other managers’ direct supervisor.

When conducting the meeting, the general manager will do about 25 percent to no more than 50 percent of the talking. This is because your managers have come to the meetings knowing what they are responsible for. They will have brought the correct information from cost of goods sold and labor costs to employee issues to project updates. They will present to the group. You want every manager engaged and participating in the meeting.

Be sure to stick to this agenda. If and when a NEW topic comes up, make sure you determine if it should be tabled until the next meeting or if you need to set up a sidebar meeting after the manager meeting. Do not add it on the fly. When you don’t control the topics, start and stop time, managers meetings go forever. Anything longer than 90 minutes creates an environment where your mangers get frustrated because they feel you don’t value their time and quite frankly, they start tuning you out.

Timeline

What day you choose for your manager meeting is up to you. It can be determined based on the day all managers would be in the building anyway, or what day inconveniences the fewest managers.

An example might look like this:

Owners meet on Tuesday allowing the general manager to complete the budget variance reports for the past week so the owners have the numbers.

On Wednesday the owners and general manager meet to get on the same page and set the agenda.

On Thursday the general manager conducts the managers meeting.

Conclusion

If you’re tired of things not getting done, tired of not making the money your restaurant should be making and/or tired of being frustrated on a daily basis with everyone’s performance — owner or manager — then you’ll want to follow the four simple steps in this article. Just remember it’s not only about being organized, it’s also about being consistent. This comes from conducting the managers meeting weekly.

If you need a sounding board or some additional assistance on following these steps toward better communication and effective manager meetings, please contact us. You can call us at 1-877-45-SMART (457-6278) or request that we contact you.

David Scott Peters is a restaurant expert, speaker, coach and trainer for independent restaurant owners. He is the developer of SMART Systems Pro, an online restaurant management software program helping the independent restaurant owner remain competitive and profitable in an industry boxed in by the big chain restaurants. He is best known as the SMART Systems guy who can walk into any restaurant and find $10,000 in undiscovered cash before he hits the back door… Guaranteed! Learn more at www.TheRestaurantExpert.com.

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The Solution to Miscommunication in Restaurants

By David Scott Peters

Couple-Examining-LaptopCommunication is key to getting anything done in your restaurant, from cleaning to profitability. The big communication challenge in restaurant management is making sure you get your message across in a manner that everyone understands and can execute what you want done how you want it done.

Now, managers and owners have very different challenges when it comes to communicating these wants.

Owners tend to fail to communicate what they want done and how they want it done. As a result they express their frustration often when their managers seem to not get their job done. Then owners start to believe the only way to get anything done is to do it themselves, resulting in highly paid babysitters as managers — people to watch the restaurant, not manage.

Managers have a completely different frustration. It’s their crazy-making owners who fly into the business creating a new list of things they want done, never explaining how they want it done and creating this list that can never be accomplished as fast as the owner would like. When the manager can’t execute on the owner’s expectations, the manager is told what they are doing wrong every day.

These challenges are completely avoidable, and I have the solution.

The best way to avoid these challenges is to have routine manger meetings.

I know what you’re saying to yourself: “David, I meet with my managers almost daily, and we still have this problem.”

When you say that to me, I’m going to tell you very quickly, the “meetings” you’re having with your managers, those are not a manager meeting. And worse, those “meetings” lead to more problems.

A manager meeting is scheduled on a weekly basis. It’s not a five-minute tirade over what didn’t get done at closing the night before. It’s a weekly, scheduled time, set aside to review goals, expectations and challenges and then brainstorm solutions.

Before you say this challenge doesn’t apply to you and your management team because you have weekly meetings, please ask yourself four questions:

1. Are my managers getting the things accomplished I want done?
2. Am I making the money in my restaurant that I deserve?
3. Am I the only one who does the talking?
4. Do my meetings go on and on and on… often running more than two hours?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, keep reading.

 

David Scott Peters is a restaurant expert, speaker, coach and trainer for independent restaurant owners. He is the developer of SMART Systems Pro, an online restaurant management software program helping the independent restaurant owner remain competitive and profitable in an industry boxed in by the big chain restaurants. He is best known as the SMART Systems guy who can walk into any restaurant and find $10,000 in undiscovered cash before he hits the back door… Guaranteed! Learn more at www.TheRestaurantExpert.com.

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“Let’s Go Somewhere Else. They Don’t Have…”

By David Scott Peters

Restaurant owners work hard every day to meet the needs of all their customers, but they often miss the one or two things they’re not doing that cost them literally thousands of dollars in lost opportunity each year.

Following are some examples of things to consider for your restaurant to increase your sales.

Scenario No. 1

When I was the chief operating officer for a franchisor of a 30-restaurant sports bars chain, I had a company credit card, like many other executives. I traveled a lot, visiting the franchisees. I conducted most of my meetings in restaurants. And I chose these restaurants based on whether or not they accepted my corporate AMEX card.

Yes, I know, as a restaurant operator, you probably wish you didn’t have to take AMEX. But you see, you can’t afford not to carry AMEX because of lost opportunity. There is a large number of business people who are traveling right now only armed with that card. And if you don’t carry it, they are taking their business somewhere else.

Scenario No. 2

When I was the operations manager of an independently owned multi-unit brew pub and café we were extremely proud to be producing and serving some the best beers you would find anywhere. Heck, we even won a medal at the Great American Beer Festival!

As beer geeks and maybe even snobs, we originally chose not to carry any domestic beers. We felt like we could convert anyone and everyone to enjoying hand crafted ales and lagers.

When we opened our second location, we were only blocks away from where three professional sports teams played their home games. We quickly learned that sports fans — and the average beer drinker — tend to drink light beer. So we started carrying the top three domestic brands. If we didn’t carry those beers, the rush of sports fans was going to go somewhere else.

Soon after we learned this lesson, our original location started carrying them, too.

What’s sad about this is we had already learned this lesson. It was the same reason we carried a small selection of wines, which represented less that 2 percent of our sales. We knew that if we didn’t carry wine, the one wine drinker in a party of eight could steer that group to another restaurant. It’s business you don’t want to lose.

Scenario No. 3

One of my Elite Members has an extremely busy seafood restaurant in Delaware. They understand the principle of if you don’t carry it, they WILL go somewhere else.

One of their top selling items on the weekends is their prime rib special — of all things in a seafood restaurant. In fact, people travel from all over just for this special.

They understand that not everyone likes seafood and if they not only have an option or two for the non-seafood lover but make it incredible, their restaurant will be full.

ID what you’re missing

Here’s a short list of questions to get you started on determining if there’s anything you can add that will stop people from coming because you don’t have that one thing.

Food

  1. Do you offer a healthy appetizer, sandwich, salad or entrée?
  2. Do you offer gluten-free menu items?
  3. Do you offer sugar-free desserts?
  4. Do you offer vegetarian menu items?

Beverages

  1. Do you offer a great iced tea?
  2. Do you serve liquor, beer or wine?
  3. Do you offer a gourmet root beer?
  4. Do you offer soy milk?

Payment Options

  1. Do you take all major credit cards?
  2. Do you accept checks?

WARNING – You can’t be all things to all people

As you go through this exercise of identifying opportunities that will result in brining in more business, know that you can’t be all things to all people. The key is to keep it simple.

Simply ask yourself the following questions:

1)    If I add this, will it be worth the effort?

2)    Will it slow down my kitchen?

3)    Will it affect my end product quality?

4)    Will it slow down or affect service?

5)    Will it make my restaurant better?
The goal here is to not be so narrow minded about your restaurant’s style that you aren’t willing to make a few necessary exceptions here and there. Consider each of the scenarios above and see if you find yourself in any of them. If so, it’s time to make some changes and eliminate the problem of “Let’s Go Somewhere Else. They Don’t Have…”.

David Scott Peters is a restaurant expert, speaker, coach and trainer for independent restaurant owners. He is the developer of SMART Systems Pro, an online restaurant management software program helping the independent restaurant owner remain competitive and profitable in an industry boxed in by the big chain restaurants. He is best known as the SMART Systems guy who can walk into any restaurant and find $10,000 in undiscovered cash before he hits the back door… Guaranteed! Learn more at www.TheRestaurantExpert.com.

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Don’t Let Your Now Become Your Future

By Fred Langley

Calendar-With-Push-Pins-futureWhatever your circumstances are, you and you alone are responsible for changing them. You’re not a victim. Solutions exist: read, attend seminars, diet, implement systems. Know that change will not happen until you commit to making it happen. Sometimes it just takes getting plain angry at your circumstances.

Whether it is struggling with bills, average or bad employees, your health, your relationships, your organizational skills or anything that is keeping you from living your best life, your best future is out there, but you must set out to find it. No matter how long it takes, it is worth it because time will pass no matter what. You might as well end up where you want to be.

Do not be the farmer that doesn’t believe the corn will grow so he doesn’t plant corn. The farmer that believes it will grow will plant the corn, water the corn, fertilize the corn, keep weeds and pests away and has a little faith that God will provide rain and sunshine. There is an inherent cause and effect, but you will never enter into that cause and effect unless you believe it is going to happen.

Growing the corn is like implementing systems and keeping them going. It’s hard work. Implementing systems will change your world. If you truly believe it will not work, you will not try it because doing nothing about your situation is easier in the short term. But you must have hope!

Do not participate in a pity party with yourself or anyone else about your situation. You will not be held back by the President, where you live or any other circumstance. All of your experiences have worked for the good to bring you to the point that you are today and, good or bad, your determination will change your future. Your life is not a snapshot; it is a film. You are not stuck in any moment in time; your story’s ending is still a work in progress.

I don’t know where you are in your story today, but whether you want to improve your situation or make a bad one a good one, you cannot move forward until you get so fed up that you draw a line in the sand and commit to changing your future. It could be health goals, financial goals or something else. Get fed up and change your tomorrow because tomorrow will arrive no matter what you do. Start small but start.

And remember everyone is in a different spot. Be proud of the progress you make and the results you achieve. And when you are struggling, believe and have hope!

Fred Langley is the director of operations and restaurant coach for TheRestaurantExpert.com. As a former chef and restaurant owner, Fred found a new passion in helping other restaurant owners find success with systems and now focuses on it full time.

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Owning It Doesn’t Mean You Can Lead It

By David Scott Peters

Leadership ImageI recently talked to a franchise owner of a fast-food chain, and he asked me, “So, what do you think is a restaurant’s greatest challenge to being successful?”

I say the biggest challenge facing restaurant owners is a lack of LEADERSHIP!

Why leadership?

Through my years of experience, coaching calls, seminars, workshops, speeches, consulting, mastermind meetings, etc., I have worked with literally thousands of restaurant owners and it’s become a pattern I can’t ignore.

I came to this conclusion as I learned the following lessons first:

1) It’s less about implementing systems and more about changing your company culture

2) Core values must be put on paper and used as the guiding principles to run your business

3) There is no such thing as common sense; you must be specific and clear with everything you want done

Leadership killers to avoid

Look, just because you own a restaurant doesn’t make you a great leader. And while some people come to leadership naturally, I think it can be a learned skill. Following is a list of what I find to be the most common leadership killers I see in restaurants.

Lack of confidence

To lead you must be confident as a person. You must feel good about yourself. You need to feel like you are smart enough to figure things out, even if you don’t know how to do something. At the very least you need to understand that you have a God-given right to go bankrupt if you so choose; it’s your place and it’s your way. Heck, fake it until you make it and stand tall.

Lack of knowledge

To lead you need to grow and learn new ways of doing things. You need to seek out help when needed. You need to be voracious on your quest to continually learn.

Fear of making a decision

To lead you must be able to make decisions. It doesn’t mean you live in a vacuum and are a lone wolf. It means your restaurant is a democratic dictatorship. You will gather opinions and ideas for everyone and anyone, but you will ultimately do what you think needs to happen and be confident in that decision, even if it ends up being a bad one later on. You will make mistakes, but the benefits of good decisions far outweigh the bad ones.

Lack of passion

To lead, as Napoleon Hill says, author of the book, “Think and Grow Rich,” you must have a burning desire to be successful. A burning desire is that inner spark that takes an ordinary person and makes them extraordinary. It’s that inner drive that takes a college athlete and propels them to a professional career or an Olympian. Often sheer passion is enough to move your business forward because it’s infectious.

Negativity

To lead, THINK LIKE A WINNER!

Lack of vision

To lead, you have to have a greater vision for what success looks like! Starting with a budget for financial goals, but also sharing your core values so that everyone on the team can not only make decisions that align, but see how each of their actions affects what you ultimately want to see your restaurant be in the future. Vision creates the destination where you are leading your people.

Poor communicator

To lead, first make sure you are clear on what you want done, how you want it done, how well you want it done and by when. When it comes to vision, budgets and customer service, make sure you document, document, document.

Lack of self-discipline

To lead, you have to not only stick to your guns, but you have to stick to them even — and especially —when the task is hard to do or uncomfortable. You must have the self-discipline to do them every day. You must be persistent that nothing and no one can stop you. A leader stays the course!

Conclusion

Just because you own a restaurant, doesn’t make you a great leader. A great leader does not have to be a born leader. A great leader can learn the skills to be great.

Look at yourself with a critical eye. After you assess where you fall, make the decision to improve. Your team and business are counting on you, and that’s what great leaders do.

David Scott Peters is a restaurant expert, speaker, coach and trainer for independent restaurant owners. He is the developer of SMART Systems Pro, an online restaurant management software program helping the independent restaurant owner remain competitive and profitable in an industry boxed in by the big chain restaurants. He is best known as the SMART Systems guy who can walk into any restaurant and find $10,000 in undiscovered cash before he hits the back door… Guaranteed! Learn more at www.TheRestaurantExpert.com.

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